Patriotic Christmas Gifts

THE ULTIMATE DESK FLAG SET IN EVERY DETAIL.  This impressive desk flag set consists of one 8″x12″ 100% nylon taffeta U.S. Flag with individually sewn stripes, and tiny but carefully embroidered stars – mounted on tapered 24-inch walnut finished staff with miniature brass plated eagle ornament.  Golden yellow fringe adorns 3 sides of the flag, braided cord and tassels. The fine polished walnut-finished base completes this beautiful and rare set, perfect to give as a gift that will be cherished for many years.  Each set individually boxed.

Proudly Made in USA!

Order here today >> Presidential Desk Flag Set

Why do people call the American Flag “Old Glory”?

According to the chronicles of American flag history, the name “Old Glory” was coined in 1831 by a shipmaster from Salem Massachusetts named Captain William Driver.  As the story goes, Captain Driver was on his way out to sea on a voyage to rescue the mutineers of the Bounty, when he was presented with a beautiful 24-star American flag.  Once at sea, when the flag opened up to the ocean’s breeze, he was heard exclaiming “Old Glory!”

Even after his retirement, Captain Driver would take his treasured flag with him to Nashville, where everyone in town recognized it as “Old Glory.”  His flag was so famous that after Tennessee seceded from the Union, Rebel fighters were determined to seize and destroy it.  But after several attempts to find it in Driver’s home, they eventually gave up.

In 1862, when Union forces once again raised the American flag over Nashville, residents started asking the Captain, “Whatever happened to “Old Glory?”

Sure enough, he was able to produce the renowned flag by releasing it from the quilted enclosure of his bed covers. As soldiers peered inside, there it was – the 24-star original American flag “Old Glory”.  What a day that was in Nashville!  On February 25, 1862, a 60 year-old Captain Driver gathered up that flag and climbed to the top of city tower, where he replaced the small Union flag with his beloved “Old Glory” to the cheers of the Sixth Ohio Regiment.

To this day, Captain William Driver’s grave in Nashville is one of the few places in America where the United States flag can be flown 24 hours a day.

Practice “Flag Etiquette” When Flying the American Flag

Ever since the American Flag was adopted by Congress in 1777 on June 14th (which we now know as Flag Day), people have set about making rules to ensure it is displayed properly and with a high degree of respect.

Even if your neighbors don’t care about how and when you fly the United States (U.S.) Flag, there are a number of guidelines that have been recorded in national law books.  In fact, if you read the Patriotic Customs section of Chapter 10 in the Title 36 of the U.S. Code, you will learn there are many accepted “norms” in how the flag should be flown.

Flying the American Flag

As Memorial Day approaches, it helps to know the proper way to display “old glory” without breaking any rules.

According to the U.S. Flag Code the following holidays are recognized as days to display the flag:

1. New Year’s Day – Jan. 1
2. Inauguration Day – Jan. 20
3. Lincoln’s Birthday – Feb. 12
4. Washington’s Birthday – third Monday in February
5. Easter Sunday – (variable)
6. Mother’s Day – second Sunday in May
7. Armed Forces Day – third Saturday in May
8. Memorial Day (half-staff until noon) – last Monday in May
9. Flag Day – June 14
10. Independence Day – July 4
11. Labor Day – first Monday in September
12. Constitution Day – Sept. 17
13. Columbus Day – second Monday in October
14. Navy Day – Oct. 27
15. Veterans Day – Nov. 11
16. Thanksgiving Day – fourth Thursday in November
17. Christmas Day – Dec. 25

In addition, the U.S. Flag Code encourages citizens to display the United States Flag on certain days that are proclaimed by the President, and on the date when their state was admitted into the union.

Flags should be raised quickly at dawn and ceremoniously lowered at dusk, and should only be displayed after dark if it dramatically lit.  On days when the flag is to be flown at half-staff, it should be raised quickly to the top, held there for a moment and then lowered to half staff.  The same should be repeated when the flag is lowered for the day.

In addition, the U.S. flag should not be displayed in the rain or snow unless the flag is weather-proof.

These are the basic rules for displaying the American flag, but there are many little-known facts which pertain to displaying the flag in public places, on vehicles or in patriotic observances.